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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BP64

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Deposition and sea level fluctuations during Miocene times, Grand Cayman, British West Indies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
sea level fluctuations
dolomitization
paleoecology
sedimentology
stratigraphy
Grand Cayman
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Der, Alexandra Jacqueline
Supervisor and department
Jones, Brian (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Harris, Nick (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Keddie, Andrew (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2012-08-28T11:46:33Z
Graduation date
2012-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The Lower to Middle Miocene Cayman Formation on Grand Cayman, which is part of the Bluff Group, is at least 130 m thick. The mostly dolomitized Cayman Formation is herein divided into a ‘limestone member’ and ‘dolostone member’ as limestone is found in the formation in the central part of Grand Cayman. Sediments of the Cayman Formation were deposited in water 10-30 m deep on an isolated open bank with no evidence of reef development. Facies development was controlled primarily by water depth and energy levels. The Cayman Formation is divided into eight facies that range from Leptoseris-Amphistegina facies to Amphistegina-Bivalve facies. Depositional environments range from deep open bank to very shallow open bank. The succession reflects two shallowing-upward sequences that are separated by a transgressive event that saw sea level rise by 20-25 m. Sea level changes were probably related to eustatic changes rather than local tectonic changes.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BP64
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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