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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R32W8G

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Impacts of community-based HIV/AIDS treatment on household livelihoods in Uganda Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
HIV/AIDS
Income and wealth
ARV treatment
Uganda
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Feulefack, Joseph Florent
Supervisor and department
Mohapatra, Sandeep (Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Luckert, Marty (Resource Economics & Environmental Sociology)
Examining committee member and department
Wilson, Sam (Economics)
Department
Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-30T16:55:43Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
We examine the effects of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment on the livelihoods of HIV/AIDS patients’ households in Uganda. Incomes of ARV households improve, on average, over the treatment period by 59.5 percent. However, for 53 percent of households incomes are increasing, while for 47 percent incomes are decreasing. The increasing households earn more income from business and from remittances & gifts, while decreasing households draw their income from forest & wild activities. Children’s time use improves income from livestock among increasing households and income from forest & wild activities among decreasing households. The effects of ARV treatment on incomes across treatment periods are positive among increasing households and negative among decreasing households, after controlling for other factors. Education significantly contributes to income of increasing households. Initial wealth increases income of ARV recipients’ households regardless of whether they are increasing or decreasing. The study could add to justifications regarding HIV/AIDS relief programs.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R32W8G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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