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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ZC7S05X

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Theses and Dissertations

Enhancing Design with Sound Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
sonification
digital humanities
interactivity
sound
design
universality
accessibility
usability
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
In, Dongju
Supervisor and department
Smallwood, Scott (Humanities Computing)
Examining committee member and department
Engel, Maureen (Humanities Computing)
Greer, Joan (Art and Design)
Department
Humanities Computing
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-05-08T14:06:21Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Over the past few decades, our computing environment has changed dramatically. As computing has become more prevalent in every part of daily life, so has using computers to understand the humanities become more commonplace. Digital Humanities has provided people a unique, broad perspective by which to further understand social phenomena using computers. Just as the appearance of the Personal Computer (PC) changed the world, we are once again experiencing a revolutionary shift with the ubiquity of mobile computing. Computing is no longer constrained to only certain locations, and much more data is thus being generated as we spend more time computing, everywhere. Today, data is unfixed and enormous. As computers grow in power and the extent to which they are integrated into our lives, the need for better usability, for as many people as possible, also grows. Without ever more efficient ways to interact with the data we are producing, we risk floundering around in a uselessly large pool of expensive information. Although hearing is an important sensory system for the perception of information, the use of sound in computing considerably less developed than the use of graphics. Sound has huge potential as an interactive computing medium, the appropriate use of which can offer a supplementary way to enhance usability. Features of sound and their possible use in computing are examined under four broad headings in this thesis: usability, interactivity, accessibility, and In ii  universality. It ends with a discussion of the potential significance of the appropriate use of sonification in advancing both our engagement with, and the efficiency of, our computing experience. Sound studies is broad, and this thesis will not cover the entire field. The objective of this thesis is to start a conversation in Digital Humanities around the use of sound in digital projects, offering a new perspective that will expand the effective utilization of sound in Digital Humanities and the digital world in general.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ZC7S05X
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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