ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Trophic cascades: Linking ungulates to shrub-dependent birds and butterfliesDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R38M0J

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Trophic cascades: Linking ungulates to shrub-dependent birds and butterflies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Canadian tiger swallowtail
trophic cascade
Elk Island National Park
ungulate
yellow warbler
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Teichman, Kristine J
Supervisor and department
Roland, Jen (Biological Sciences)
Nielsen, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Hood, Glynnis (Environmental Science and Studies)
Bayne, Erin (Biological Sciences)
Tonn, Bill (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2013-01-21T15:00:30Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Top predators are known to regulate freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. However, few studies have demonstrated trophic cascades in productive and biologically diverse terrestrial ecosystems. Elk Island National Park and surrounding protected areas have a wide range in the intensity of use by ungulates (IUU) (2.3 to 53.4 units/km2) due to the functional loss of top predators, management for high ungulate numbers and variable hunting pressure. To evaluate whether high IUU results in a trophic cascade, I examined vegetation characteristics and the abundance of shrub-dependent yellow warblers (Dendroica petechia) and Canadian tiger swallowtails (Papilio canadensis). Areas with high IUU resulted in loss of horizontal shrub cover that resulted in reductions of yellow warblers. Abundance of Canadian tiger swallowtail was related to reductions in larval host plant density, particularly chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). This study provides evidence of a species-level trophic cascade, initiated by a combined effect of the loss of top predators and management for high ungulate densities.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R38M0J
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-24T22:25:24.082+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1975336
Last modified: 2015:10:12 11:50:39-06:00
Filename: Teichman_Kristine_Spring_2013.pdf
Original checksum: dcb34fee0265df27ae6b404c1a7e85e6
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File author: Teichman, Kristine
Page count: 107
File language: en-US
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date