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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SK98

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Vibration Signal-Based Fault Detection for Rotating Machines Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Fault detection
deconvolution
control systems
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McDonald, Geoffrey Lyall
Supervisor and department
Zhao, Qing (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Hahn, Jin-Oh (Department of Mechanical Engineering)
Tavakoli, Mahdi (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-20T04:17:00Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Fault detection in rotating machinery has applications in fields such as wind turbines and helicopter transmissions. Detecting and diagnosing faults is important to maintenance planning, preventing equipment damage, and preventing failure. During this presentation, two novel signal-based methods will be presented; one based on adaptive control theory, one based on deconvolution. The adaptive control theory approach is an adaptive sum-of-sinusoid model used for one-step ahead prediction. The presented deconvolution approach is a periodic expansion of the well established Minimum Entropy Deconvolution method. Results are presented on simulated signals, acceleration data from a gearbox with seeded gear tooth faults, and bearing proximity sensor data from two 50MW back pressure steam turbine generators with suspected rotor-to-stator rubbing regions.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3SK98
Rights
License granted by Geoff McDonald (glmcdona@gmail.com) on 2011-09-16T14:53:24Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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