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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R39T32

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Feeding value of triticale-based dry distillers’ grains plus solubles in the diets of growing lambs Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Lamb
Triticale
Carcass
Distillers' grains
Growth performance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
McKeown, Lisa
Supervisor and department
Okine, Erasmus (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Oba, Masahito (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
McKinnon, John (Department of Animal and Poultry Science)
McAllister, Tim (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-07T17:33:39Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Nutrient profiles of distillers’ grains are primarily affected by the type of grain used for ethanol production, but the feeding value of triticale-based dry distillers’ grains plus solubles (TDDGS) has not been extensively studied. The first study showed that, compared to 20% corn- or wheat-based distillers’ grains diets, 20% TDDGS diet increased cis-9 trans-11 linoleic acid concentration in carcass fat without affecting growth performance of lambs. In the second study, lamb growth performance was not affected by the addition of up to 60% TDDGS in the diet, but the risk of urinary calculi increased at higher inclusion levels. Lambs fed 20% TDDGS had higher cold carcass weights and grade rules than lambs fed 40 or 60% TDDGS. Increasing TDDGS decreased diet digestibility, and increased nitrogen and phosphorus excretion. In conclusion, TDDGS can be used in diets for growing ruminants, and its utilization efficiency may be optimized at 20% dietary inclusion.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R39T32
Rights
License granted by Lisa McKeown (lmckeown@ualberta.ca) on 2010-01-04T20:29:48Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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