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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3QB9VH1S

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Skeletal Muscle Sympathetic Vasoconstrictor Control Following Short-Term Mild- and Heavy-Intensity Exercise Training Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Exercise Training
Sympathetic Nervous System
Vasoconstriction
Vascular Conductance
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G
Supervisor and department
Darren DeLorey, PhD Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation; Rehabilitation Medicine
Examining committee member and department
Gordon Bell, PhD Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Frances Plane, PhD Department of Pharmacology
Paul Fadel, PhD School of Medicine Department of Pharmacology and Physiology University of Missouri
Michael Kennedy, PhD Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Robert Haennel, PhD Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
Department
Physical Education and Recreation
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-07-03T15:13:42Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the effects of short-term endurance exercise training (ET) on sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. To achieve these aims, rats were exercise trained on a motorized treadmill and an anesthetised whole animal in situ vascular preparation was used to investigate the effects of ET on sympathetic vascular control in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Exercise training augmented resting sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in a training intensity-dependent manner. Concurrently, endothelium-dependent vasodilation was augmented in a training intensity-dependent manner and significantly correlated to the magnitude of sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness. During acute exercise sympathetic outflow is increased however the vascular response to sympathetic stimulation is diminished and aids in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow; a physiologic phenomenon termed functional sympatholysis. The inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction during muscular contraction was augmented in a manner influenced by the intensity of ET through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Given the increased resting sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and enhanced sympatholysis following training, it was hypothesized that ET may mediate these effects, in part, by an altered contribution of post-synaptic α2-adrenergic receptors to the regulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction. Exercise training significantly augmented the contribution of α2-adrenergic receptor to basal sympathetic vasoconstriction. During contraction the α2-adrenergic receptor was relatively resistant to inhibition. The ET induced increase in sympatholysis was mediated, in part, by the inhibition of the α1-adrenergic receptor through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these results highlight the integrated nature of ET mediated adaptations to sympathetic regulation of skeletal muscle vascular conductance and the plasticity of sympathetic regulation of skeletal muscle vascular conductance.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3QB9VH1S
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Jendzjowsky NG, and DeLorey DS. Short-term exercise training augments the vascular response to sympathetic stimulation. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 303:R332-R339, 2012.Jendzjowsky NG, and DeLorey DS. Short-term exercise training enhances functional sympatholysis through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. J Physiol 591: 1535-1549, 2013.

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