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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34351

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Investigation of intermittent electrical stimulation as a potential prophylaxis against the formation of deep pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
pressure ulcers
spinal cord injury
deep tissue injury
electrical stimulation
prevention
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Gyawali, Selina
Supervisor and department
Mushahwar, Vivian (Cell Biology)
Examining committee member and department
Ferguson-Pell, Martin (Rehabilitation Medicine)
Thompson, Richard (Biomedical Engineering)
Gordon, Tessa (Centre for Neuroscience)
Department
Centre for Neuroscience
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-10-07T18:52:18Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe form of pressure ulcers resulting from ischemia and mechanical damage due to unrelieved pressure. Despite many preventative methods, none so far has significantly reduced the incidence of DTI. The use of a novel method of pressure ulcer prevention, intermittent electrical stimulation (IES), was investigated. The current study investigated the effects of IES on surface pressure and tissue oxygenation in individuals with SCI. The results demonstrated that IES induced contractions caused significant reductions in pressure around the ischial tuberosities, as well as significant and sustained increases in oxygenation. Direct measurements of oxygen in an invasive rodent model indicated that IES induced contractions resulted in a 20-100% increase in tissue oxygenation. The results indicate that IES directly targets the pathogenic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers and thereby may be an effective method for the prevention of DTI.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34351
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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