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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M90287B

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Cranial anatomy of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada Open Access

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Author or creator
Currie, P. J.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Alberta
Coelurosauria
Theropoda
Dinosauria
Cretaceous
Skull anatomy
Saurischia
Tyrannosauridae
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Beautifully preserved, nearly complete theropod skeletons from Alberta (Canada) allow re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of North American tyrannosaurids. It is concluded that the most parsimonious interpretation of relationships leads to the separation of the two species of Albertosaurus (sensu Russell 1970) into Gorgosaurus libratus from the Campanian Dinosaur Park Formation and Albertosaurus sarcophagus from the upper Campanian/lower Maastrichtian Horseshoe Canyon Formation. Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus are closely related, but can be distinguished from each other by more characters than are known to justify generic distinction within another tyrannosaurid clade that includes Daspletosaurus, Tarbosaurus and Tyrannosaurus. Daspletosaurus is known from multiple species that cover extensive geographic, ecological and temporal ranges, and it is sensible to maintain its generic distinction from Tyrannosaurus. All tyrannosaurid species have consistent ontogenetic trends. However, one needs to be cautious in assessing ontogenetic stage because many characters are size-dependent rather than age-dependent. There are relatively few osteological differences that can distinguish tyrannosaurid species at any age. For example, Nanotyrannus lancensis is probably a distinct species from Tyrannosaurus rex because there is no evidence of ontogenetic reduction of tooth counts in any other tyrannosaurid species. Some characters that are good for separating mature tyrannosaurids, such as differences in the sizes and shapes of maxillary fenestrae, are not useful for identifying the species of juveniles.
Date created
2003
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M90287B
License information
Rights
© 2003 Polish Academy of Sciences, Institue of Paleobiology. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
Citation for previous publication
Currie, P. J. (2003). Cranial anatomy of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 48(2), 191-226.
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File title: Cranial anatomy of tyrannosaurid dinosaurs from the Late Cretaceous of Alberta,Canada
File author: Currie, P.J.
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