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Venison to beef and deviance from truth: biotelemetry for detecting seasonal wolf prey selection in Alberta Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
radiocollar
Global Positioning System
wolves
diet
telemetry
Canis lupus
prey composition
Alberta
precision
measurement error
livestock
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Morehouse, Andrea
Supervisor and department
Boyce, Mark S. (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Cassady St. Clair, Colleen (Biological Sciences)
Foote, Lee (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-03T15:15:39Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
An abrupt interface between mountains and prairies in southwestern Alberta means wilderness areas and carnivore populations overlap cattle grazing lands. Consequently, there is concern about the effects of large carnivores, especially wolves, on livestock. I used GPS clusters and scat samples to determine year-round wolf diets in this region. Both methods indicated a significant seasonal shift in wolf diets from wild prey during the non-grazing season to cattle in the grazing season. The GPS cluster method effectively identified wolf kills but this method relies on telemetry with high accuracy and precision. In southwestern Alberta, Argos satellite radicollars have been used extensively by wildlife managers. I compare how differences in precision between GPS and Argos technologies affect the estimation of habitat-selection models. Differences in accuracy and precision can lead to erroneous conclusions about animal selection of habitat.
Language
English
Rights
License granted by Andrea Morehouse (morehous@ualberta.ca) on 2010-07-28T23:32:47Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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