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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33706

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Internal wave tunnelling: Laboratory experiments Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Internal
Waves
Tunnelling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Gregory, Kate D
Supervisor and department
Sutherland, Bruce (Physics / Earth & Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Moodie, Bryant (Mathematical & Statistical Sciences)
Reuter, Gerhard (Earth & Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Mathematical & Statistical Sciences / Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-11-25T20:43:27Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Heuristics based upon ray theory are often used to predict the propagation of internal gravity waves in non-uniform media. In particular, they predict that waves reflect from weakly stratified regions where the local buoyancy frequency is less than the wave frequency. However, if the layer of weak stratification is sufficiently thin, waves can partially transmit through it in a process called tunnelling. The first laboratory evidence of internal wave tunnelling through a weakly stratified region is analysed using the synthetic schlieren technique and the Hilbert transform is applied to filter the wavefield into upward- and downward-propagating components. Transmission is calculated as the squared ratio of transmitted and incident wave amplitude and using an appropriate superposition of plane waves to reproduce the structure of the incident wave beam, a corresponding weighted sum of transmissions can be used to predict the beam transmission. These transmission predictions are compared with experimental measurements.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33706
Rights
License granted by Kate Gregory (kgregory@ualberta.ca) on 2009-11-24T18:00:07Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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