ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Community living after stroke: an ecological modelDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3SX3F

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Community living after stroke: an ecological model Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
activity
ecological model
community integration
stroke
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Anderson, Sharon
Supervisor and department
Dr. Kyle Whitfield (Faculty of Extension)
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Laurel Strain (Department of Sociology, Director of the Alberta Centre on Aging)
Dr. Alex Clark (Faculty of Nursing)
Department
Centre for Health Promotion Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-04-14T19:40:33Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Background: Over 80% of people who experience stroke survive, but for half, their level of activity drops significantly. Even survivors with mild disability become disengaged. Research Question: Based on an ecological model, what perceived facilitators and barriers do stroke survivors encounter in their choice of everyday activities 1 to 6 years after stroke? Methods: Situational analysis grounded theory. Results: Disability changed participant’s social position regarding their ability to control their own situation to dependence on other people to facilitate choice. Re-negotiating identity and position in society was an iterative process of scaffolding small tasks into activities through bargaining for access to practical support and inclusion into social situations. Conclusions: Stroke survivors who experienced inclusion in their communities resumed some level of meaningful activities more successfully. However, some with mild disability had difficulty resuming activities as they were expected to system navigate and adapt on their own.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3SX3F
Rights
License granted by Sharon Anderson (sdanders@ualberta.ca) on 2010-04-13T21:02:58Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-29T18:04:44.586+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 548727
Last modified: 2015:10:12 15:11:04-06:00
Filename: Anderson Thesis Apr _14.pdf
Original checksum: fa1f62c6c3966da69901da170912dbbb
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - Anderson Thesis Apr _12
File author: Sharon
Page count: 154
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date