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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3V960

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Cross-cultural Adaptation Strategies of South Asian Family-sponsored Spouses Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
language
settlement
support systems
adjustment
Canada
adaptation
Pakistani
cross-cultural
social
Sponsored Spouses
Family Class
thematic analysis
family sponsorship
South Asian
integration
ethnography
immigration
economy
Indian
culture
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Yousaf, Taooz
Supervisor and department
Merali, Noorfarah (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Pei, Jacqueline (Educational Psychology)
Buck, George (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Psychological Studies in Education
Date accepted
2013-12-19T15:28:37Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
South Asians in Canada are increasingly using the Family Class immigration category to sponsor spouses from their home countries. This qualitative study examined the steps family-sponsored spouses and their sponsors or family members have taken to facilitate their linguistic, economic, social, and cultural integration in Canada. Second, the role cultural community and religious organizations play in facilitating the adaptation of these individuals was explored. Five sponsored spouses from India and Pakistan who had been living in Canada for up to five years were interviewed. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results highlighted that participants who received their Canadian spouse's support had positive adaptation experiences compared to those who did not receive support. Participants took active steps to learn English, Canadian culture, and used community social networks and organizations to adjust to, learn about, and become independent in Canada. Implications for families, education, and government policy are discussed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3V960
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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