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Quantifying the nitrogen benefits of cool season pulse crops to an Alberta prairie cropping system Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Canola
Wheat
Pea
Crop rotation
Lupin
Pulse crops
Barley
Faba bean
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Williams, Christina Marie
Supervisor and department
King, Jane (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Examining committee member and department
Dyck, Miles (Renewable Resources)
Spaner, Dean (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Department
Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-09-30T16:04:08Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Diverse crop rotations are an important part of sustainable agricultural systems. More information is needed in Alberta on the effects of adding pulse crops to current rotations. This experiment investigated the effects of ‘Snowbird’ tannin-free faba bean (Vicia faba L.), ‘Arabella’ narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.), and ‘Canstar’ field pea (Pisum sativum L.) on subsequent barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), canola (Brassica napus L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops in rotation at two sites in central Alberta (Barrhead and St. Albert). In YR1 of rotation faba bean had the highest potential for N fixation followed by pea and lupin and N returned to the soil in above ground crop residues was similar across pulse species. In YR2 of rotation faba bean and pea stubble was able to maintain the yield and quality of subsequent barley, canola and wheat crops. Pulse crops can improve the sustainability of the Alberta cropping system.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 1981809
Last modified: 2015:10:12 12:51:37-06:00
Filename: Williams_Christina_Fall 2011.pdf
Original checksum: 6f479d1308b8be3f6eb23df5aca58500
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Valid: true
File author: Christina Williams
Page count: 165
File language: en-CA
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