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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3GK7Q

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Mathematical modelling of HTLV-I infection: a study of viral persistence in vivo Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
viral Tax protein
ordinary differential equations
CD4+ helper T-cells
Butler-McGehee Lemma
compound systems
HTLV-I
retrovirology
global stability
Poincare-Bendixson Theorem
immune response
immunology
backward bifurcation
monotone dynamical systems
Lozinskii measure
latently infected target cells
mathematical modelling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lim, Aaron Guanliang
Supervisor and department
Li, Michael Y. (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Wang, Hao (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
Muldowney, James S. (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
Jutta Preiksaitis (Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases)
Department
Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-09T19:06:09Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a persistent human retrovirus characterized by life-long infection and risk of developing HAM/TSP, a progressive neurological and inflammatory disease. Despite extensive studies of HTLV-I, a complete understanding of the viral dynamics has been elusive. Previous mathematical models are unable to fully explain experimental observations. Motivated by a new hypothesis for the mechanism of HTLV-I infection, a three dimensional compartmental model of ordinary differential equations is constructed that focusses on the highly dynamic interactions among populations of healthy, latently infected, and actively infected target cells. Results from mathematical and numerical investigations give rise to relevant biological interpretations. Comparisons of these results with experimental observations allow us to assess the validity of the original hypothesis. Our findings provide valuable insights to the infection and persistence of HTLV-I in vivo and motivate future mathematical and experimental work.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3GK7Q
Rights
License granted by Aaron Lim (agl@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-07T23:59:58Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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