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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3VS6T

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Using international volunteer experiences to educate university students for global citizenship Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
international
global citizenship
education
post-colonial
university
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Jorgenson, Shelane
Supervisor and department
Shultz, Lynette (Educational Policy Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Abdi, Ali (Educational Policy Studies)
Johnston, Ingrid (Secondary Education)
Department
Department of Educational Policy Studies
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-07-13T21:03:18Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Several writers have described the aim of global citizenship education as developing in students a global ethic of social justice. Western post-secondary institutions have endeavored to educate students for global citizenship by traveling to and volunteering in developing countries. Such programs have the potential to perpetuate the epistemic violence of colonialism by ignoring the ways in which students appropriate the developing world as ‘other’ as use these experiences to solely benefit themselves. In order to address such issues and concerns, this qualitative study used post-colonial theory to analyze the experiences and reflections of six participants who participated in a Canadian university global citizenship program in Thailand. The study suggests that culture and perceived cultural differences have a major effect on how students understand their identity and agency as global citizens, bringing forth dimensions of ambivalence and cultural hybridity. In order for programs to develop a global ethic of social justice, however, students need to be informed and reflexive about the social-historical context of the country they are visiting as well as their positionality in relation to the people they engage with.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3VS6T
Rights
License granted by Shelane Jorgenson (shelane@ualberta.ca) on 2009-07-10T19:27:35Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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