ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Habits of Resistance: Feminism, Phenomenology, and TemporalityDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3HH6C88Z

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

University of Alberta Libraries

Collections

This file is not currently in any collections.

Habits of Resistance: Feminism, Phenomenology, and Temporality Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Rodier, Kristin Anne
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Resistance
Temporality
Phenomenology
Habit
Feminism
Type of item
Book
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
Feminist resistance to gender oppression, while surely a collective political project, has an important individual dimension. Individual resistance most often takes the shape of self-transformation where one works on the self to change desires, attitudes, and practices. I argue that paradigms of self-transformation that rely on willpower or increased self-knowledge for change can responsibilize oppressed persons when changing proves difficult, which frustrates feminist ends. Because of this I argue that habit deserves increased attention from feminists working on personal resistance to gender oppression. I analyse a range of contexts in which habit appears and I underscore its temporal character in order to render intelligible problems in feminist theories of resistance. I work from the assumption that habits have both a negative and a positive quality—they can keep us stuck, but they also provide the ground from which we can change. While habits have been theorized as the reason for a lack of social change, I argue that habit reveals to us that much of how we are constituted is actually our personal control. I argue that paying closer attention to habitual constitution reveals that there are both multiple kinds of habits and also multiple strategies that can change them. At the same time as I argue for increased attention to habit, I build a relationship between lived experiences of temporality and how social forces produce meaningful temporal narratives. In this sense, I engage with our habits of time. I situate this project in contemporary feminist theories and draw on the phenomenological and existential traditions drawing primarily on the works of Simone de Beauvoir, Edmund Husserl, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. My overarching concern is not to say what habit is or what habits we should have, but rather to see what habit does.
Date created
2014/12/22
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3HH6C88Z
License information
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported
Rights

Citation for previous publication

Source
Link to related item

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-12-23T17:43:57.434+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (PDF/A)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 601148
Last modified: 2015:10:12 14:31:51-06:00
Filename: Rodier_Kristin_A_201412_PhD.pdf
Original checksum: f1159d23b5ab07f6cda978a4e4fedb46
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - Rodier Dissertation Final.docx
Page count: 221
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date