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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TM72C3C

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POTENTIAL ANTHROPOSOL DEVELOPMENT USING PHOSPHOGYPSUM AS A SUBSTRATE WITH SOIL AND ORGANIC AMENDMENTS Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Soil
Amendments
Hydraulic
Phosphogypsym
Organic
Anthroposol
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Abou Rizk, Jenna S
Supervisor and department
Naeth, Anne (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Ramirez, Guillermo (Renewable Resources)
Nichol, Connie (Renewable Resources)
Chanasyk, David (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Land Reclamation and Remediation
Date accepted
2015-08-19T08:53:21Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Phopshopgypsum is a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer production resulting from the production of phosphoric acid from phosphate rock (Rutherford et al. 1994a). Most reclamation plans for phosphogypsum stacks include a cover system that is installed over the stack; thus research in the area of phosphogypsum has been mainly related to capping depths. Use of phosphogypsum in building anthroposols for reclamation and/or agricultural uses would require amendments to ameliorate its undesirable properties. Experiments were conducted on the potential for use of phosphogypsum as a substrate or soil building material by assessing plant performance and health, hydraulic conductivity, leachate content and select microbiological properties. Phosphogypsum amended with topsoil, specifically clay topsoil in approximate ratios of 40 to 50 % by volume, resulted in increased plant height, health and biomass. Addition of greater than 60 % sandy soil by volume resulted in a more optimal hydraulic conductivity and reduced the concentrations of components of leachate to meet Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment guidelines for aquatic life and agricultural use. A microbiological community was present in phosphogypsum, mainly composed of gram positive bacteria, fungi, denitrifiers and sulphate reducers. Addition of an anionic solution to phosphogypsum mixes with soil increased these numbers and addition of a sandy soil to phosphogypsum increased the number of gram negative bacteria. Thus amending phosphogypsum would be potentially useful as a soil building material or substrate.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3TM72C3C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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