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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R39W78

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I Am Not a Problem, I Am Canadian: Exploring the Experiences of Canadian-born Muslim Women Who Practice Hijab Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
hijab
Muslim women
racism
identity
Canadian
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mian, Ayesha Kanval
Supervisor and department
Chovanec, Donna (Educational Policy Studies)
Examining committee member and department
Kapoor, Dip (Educational Policy Studies)
Abu-Laban, Yasmeen (Political Science)
Department
Department of Educational Policy Studies
Specialization
Theoretical, Cultural, and International Studies in Education
Date accepted
2012-09-26T14:57:29Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This research explores understandings of what it means to “be Canadian” for Canadian-born Muslim women who practice hijab, an outward expression of personal identity practiced by some Muslim women and visible by the covering of the head and modest clothing. The women’s identity negotiations occur within discourses of Orientalism and multiculturalism, which construct the women’s identities as outside of social and state conceptions of what it means to “be Canadian.” Through dialogic, reflexive, and collaborative research processes guided by theories of antiracism feminism and modes of narrative inquiry, the experiences of Canadian-born Muslim women who practice hijab contribute to a growing understanding of manifestations and processes of racism in Canada. The women’s narratives and understandings of what it means to “be Canadian” highlight the reality of our present Canada so we can formulate our resistances and move forward in our journeys toward creating new realities.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R39W78
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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