ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Exploring Minor Hockey Players' Knowledge About and Attitudes Toward Concussion: Implications for PreventionDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3833H

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Exploring Minor Hockey Players' Knowledge About and Attitudes Toward Concussion: Implications for Prevention Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
attitudes
symptom reporting
prevention
concussion
information sources
behaviour
knowledge translation
knowledge
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Perra, Andrea T
Supervisor and department
Mrazik, Martin (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Naidu, Dhiren (Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation)
Klassen, Robert (Education Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization
Counselling Psychology
Date accepted
2012-09-28T10:24:41Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Education
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Concussions in ice hockey are a serious public health concern, however too many athletes fail to recognize or report their symptoms. A survey was developed to assess minor hockey players’ concussion knowledge, attitudes, and reporting behaviour, as little is known from their perspective. Male and female Pee Wee, Bantam, and Midget level players (n = 183) and a comparison group of non-hockey players (n = 37) completed the questionnaire. Players had foundational knowledge about concussions, however over half underestimated the prevalence and over 30% were unaware of return to play (RTP) protocols. Although nearly all players knew what they “should” do when concussed, 18% did not follow recommendations. Players reported more concern and appreciation of the seriousness of concussion compared to non-players, but they tended to minimize their vulnerability. The most common and helpful information sources were parents, doctors, and coaches, therefore knowledge translation efforts should target theses audiences.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3833H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-04-24T23:08:40.685+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 859165
Last modified: 2015:10:18 01:40:37-06:00
Filename: Perra_Andrea_Fall_2012.pdf
Original checksum: 38bf6ef2df23ca36619cc713eb16db21
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Unexpected error in findFonts java.lang.ClassCastException: edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfSimpleObject cannot be cast to edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfDictionary offset=2953
Status message: Invalid Annotation list offset=801183
File language: en-CA
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date