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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3Q64Z

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Imaging bone fractures using ultrasonic scattered wavefields: numerical and in-vitro studies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
ultrasound imaging
reverse time migration
split step Fourier migration
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Li, Hongjiang
Supervisor and department
Le, Lawrence (Radiology & Diagnostic Imaging)
Sacchi, Mauricio (Physics)
Examining committee member and department
Lou, Edmond (Electrical and Computer Engineering/Surgery)
Currie, Claire (Physics)
Adeeb, Samer (Civil & Environmental Engineering)
Department
Department of Physics
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-06-15T17:22:04Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Ultrasound has been widely used in medical diagnostic imaging to image soft tissues. Compared with other methods, ultrasound is superior with no ionizing-radiation, easy portability, low cost, and the capability to provide elasticity information. Conventional ultrasound images provide distorted image information when the ultrasound beam is not normal to the bone structures. In this thesis, we present two imaging algorithms: reverse time migration (RTM) and split-step Fourier migration (SSFM), to image long bones using ultrasound. The methods are tested using simulated data sets. The reconstructed images show accurate cortical thickness measurement and provide the correct fracture dip. The images also clearly illustrate the healing process of a 1-mm wide crack with different in-filled tissue velocities simulating fracture healing. Two in-vitro examples using fractured bones are also presented. The study has showed that the migration methods have great potential to quantify bone fractures and monitor the fracture healing process.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3Q64Z
Rights
License granted by HONGJIANG LI (hli7@ualberta.ca) on 2011-06-13T19:25:05Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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