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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34427

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Early late Paleocene mammals from the Roche Percée local fauna, southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Mammals
Roche Percée local fauna
Early late Paleocene
Saskatchewan
Canada
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Rankin, Brian
Supervisor and department
Fox, Richard (Biological Sciences)
Wilson, Mark (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Murray, Alison (Biological Sciences)
Willoughby, Pamela (Anthropology)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-10-06T16:13:53Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master's of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The occurrence of vertebrate fossils from the Ravenscrag Formation near Roche Percée, southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada, documents the presence of a large and diverse assemblage of early late Paleocene (approximately 58 million years) mammals. Previous studies of the Roche Percée localities have examined only a small portion of the fauna, with the vast majority of taxa remaining undescribed. The current research centers on the identification, description and, where appropriate, evolutionary relationships of these undescribed mammals. Significant discoveries, to date, include two new species of the rare viverravid carnivoran Raphictis, a new species of the phenacodontid condylarth Ectocion, a large collection of a probable new species of the semi-aquatic pantolestid Palaeosinopa, and only the second known occurrence of the predominantly European lipotyphlan Adapisorex in North America. This research provides an improved understanding of mammalian diversity and evolution in the northern part of the Western Interior during this important time interval.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34427
Rights
License granted by Brian Rankin (bdrankin@ualberta.ca) on 2009-10-02T17:20:53Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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