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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R33S5M

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The calm carrel: a relaxation technique for students with emotional and behavioural disorders Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
education
calm
behaviour
children
self-management
inclusion
time-out
music
elementary
relaxation
carrel
visualization
disorders
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Cameron, Kent
Supervisor and department
Goldberg, Jack (Educational Psychology)
Examining committee member and department
Smith, Veronica (Educational Psychology)
Dworet, Don (Education) (Brock University)
Sobsey, Dick (Educational Psychology)
Leroy, Carol (Elementary Education)
Rinaldi, Christina (Educational Psychology)
Department
Department of Educational Psychology
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-12-03T22:10:13Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
The present study examined the implementation of a self-management strategy, termed the calm carrel, as a potential means of bringing about behavioural improvement (as reflected, primarily, in global behavioural ratings, extent of isolation time-out assignments, and student and teacher feedback) among six classes of Grade 4 to 6 children with emotional and behavioural disorders, being educated in self-contained classroom settings. The intervention consisted of a carrel within the class which students could choose to visit for up to three, 5-minute periods per day. While at the carrel, students could select from a variety of audio-based strategies provided on a CD player, comprising soothing music selections, as well as progressive muscle relaxation exercises, and visualization narratives which the children could work through. The option of completing a simple “problem-solving form”, as a means of reflecting upon their behaviour, was also provided. During both the 20-day baseline and 20-day experimental phase of the study, teachers maintained daily behavioural ratings and time-out frequency counts (also indicating the precipitating factor in the case of each time-out). Students kept their own records of carrel usage, and also completed pre- and post-intervention surveys and feedback forms. At the conclusion of the study, teachers completed a feedback form and were interviewed by the researcher. T-tests, Wilcoxon-signed rank tests, and ANOVA tests on the quantitative data garnered from the study, did not reveal the presence of significant trends suggestive of behavioural changes, within the data. Both student and teacher feedback, however, was largely positive, and can be regarded as indicative of the calm carrel’s value as an intervention blending self-management and relaxation techniques to provide a non-punitive student-directed alternative to the predominantly teacher-mediated approaches often characteristic of EBD classrooms. The intervention, deemed worthy of further study as a result of the present thesis, is thought to represent a technique which might help to facilitate the transition of students with EBD from segregated to inclusive class settings, insofar as it should be equally feasible to implement in both environments.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33S5M
Rights
License granted by Kent Cameron (kcameron@ualberta.ca) on 2010-12-03T21:59:44Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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