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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3DS8J

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Plant and soil biophysical properties for evaluating land reclamation in Jasper National Park, Canada Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Canadian Rocky Mountains
land reclamation
Jasper National Park
ecological monitoring
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
STEINKE, LANCE AVERY
Supervisor and department
Naeth, M. Anne (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Hamann, Andreas (Renewable Resources)
Krogman, Naomi (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Chanasyk, D. S. (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-29T01:13:33Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Land Reclamation and Remediation
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Jasper National Park has numerous disturbances in the montane and subalpine ecoregions of varying ages and causes, such as pipelines, road ways, trade waste pits and recreational activities. These disturbances are in various degrees of effective reclamation, in some cases soil conditions have promoted invasion by non-native plant species that in turn have limited self sustaining native plant communities. Of 23 research sites 4 are effectively reclaimed and another 4 are not because of the over abundance of non-native plant species. Presently, there is no standard method for use in Jasper National Park to monitor and judge effectiveness of land reclamation. This research thesis developed a biophysical monitoring and evaluation process which is simple to employ, efficient and economic. Along with plant and litter cover, species composition, and individual densities there are 8 soil physical and chemical properties which can support science-based ecosystem management of human initiated land disturbances.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3DS8J
Rights
License granted by Lance Steinke (lance.steinke@hotmail.ca) on 2011-08-28T14:45:48Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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