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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ST6J

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Theses and Dissertations

The fitness consequences of variation in resting metabolic rate in juvenile North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Metabolic rate, red squirrels, survival, variation
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Larivee, Meghan
Supervisor and department
Boutin, Stan (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Bayne, Erin (Biological Sciences)
Hudson, Robert (Renewable Resource Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-05-22T15:23:23Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Resting metabolic rate (RMR) is the minimum energy expenditure necessary for survival. RMR varies widely both among and within species and a central question in evolutionary physiology concerns the functional basis for this variation. Juvenile North American red squirrels were used to investigate fitness consequences of variation in RMR by considering how expenditure relates to differences in food availability and to overwinter survival. Additionally, this thesis examines whether red squirrels exhibit phenotypic plasticity in RMR in response to varying levels of food availability. Results indicate that heavier juveniles with relatively low RMRs were more likely to survive overwinter. Moreover, these juveniles were capable of allocating more energy towards mechanical work and possessed larger food stores. Food supplemented yearlings exhibited higher RMRs than unsupplemented controls at the onset of the breeding season, while no difference in RMR was detected following termination of supplementation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ST6J
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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