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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FS97

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Investigating The Role Of Fibrocystin/Polyductin In Cholangiocarcinoma Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Fibrocystin/polyductin
Bile duct cancer
Cell adhesion molecules
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Abuetabh, Yasser H
Supervisor and department
Hugh, Judith (Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Sergi, Consolato (Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Examining committee member and department
Martin, Jonathan (Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Persad, Sujata (Department of Pediatrics)
Solez, Kim (Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology)
Department
Medical Sciences- Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-03-19T09:27:13Z
Graduation date
2013-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) represents a very devastating liver neoplasm, whose incidence is increasing worldwide. CCA is often diagnosed in its late stages, and the treatment options for this disease are restricted to surgical resection and liver transplantation. Our group demonstrated that fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC) plays a significant role in the development of the bile duct. Furthermore, FPC expression was detected in infantile cholangiopathies as well as in adult CCA. This thesis demonstrates the presence of differential abnormal expression and localization patterns of cell adhesion molecules in the CCA cell lines, which was not associated with FPC expression. Furthermore, this data supports that FPC is an essential growth factor for CCA cells. Although much remains to be elucidated, the data presented in this thesis may represent a step forward for investigating the intracellular mechanisms that underline the development of CCA, hence providing insight into future therapeutic options for CCA.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FS97
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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