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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3W91D

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The effects of culverts on upstream fish passage in Alberta foothill streams Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
passage
fragmentation
culvert
trout
sampling
Arctic Grayling
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
MacPherson, Laura
Supervisor and department
Sullivan, Michael (Biological Sciences)
Foote, Lee (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Stevens, Cameron (Golder Associates)
Wilkinson, Craig (Agriculture, Food and Nutritional Sciences)
Aku, Peter (Alberta Conservation Association)
Saddique, Tariq (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-06-21T15:16:22Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In the Rocky Mountain foothills of Alberta, Canada, activities of the forestry and energy sectors have resulted in the installation of tens of thousands of stream-crossing structures. In fifteen Athabasca River basins I found that culverts impeded upstream movements of non-sportfish species relative to reference bridge sites. Conversely, abundances of Rainbow Trout significantly increased upstream of culverts. I suggest that culverts that exclude Burbot, a voracious predator, or high temperatures above culverts allow for increased productivity of Rainbow Trout. Water quality and substrate composition did not noticeably change upstream and downstream of bridges, while culverts had significantly higher water temperatures and silt/sand upstream. In evaluating the effectiveness and temporal biases of common sampling techniques, I found that backpack electrofishing and angling had the highest Arctic grayling detection probabilities. Angling detected larger juvenile and adult fish (>110 mm), while young-of-the-year were more easily detected using backpack electrofishing in later summer.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3W91D
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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