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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3Z62C

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Saproxylic Beetles (Coleoptera) Associated With Aspen Deadwood in Broad-Leaved Boreal Mixedwood Stands Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
beetles
aspen
coleoptera
snag
decay
deadwood
biodiversity
collection method
Populus
forest
saproxylic
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Wood, Charlene M
Supervisor and department
Langor, David (Renewable Resources)
Spence, John (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Macdonald, Ellen (Renewable Resources)
Erbilgin, Nadir (Renewable Resources)
Evenden, Maya (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Conservation Biology
Date accepted
2012-09-24T15:30:57Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
I assessed deadwood-associated (i.e., ‘saproxylic’) beetles (Coleoptera) along a decay gradient of trembling aspen in mature deciduous stands of the boreal mixedwood forest in NW Alberta. Various collection methods were employed to sample saproxylic beetle species. Assemblages differed between host substrate types and decay classes. Many species were also associated with moss presence and percent bark cover. Although small (7 to 15.9 cm) diameter logs were most abundant in the stands, most indicator species were associated with logs ≥25 cm in diameter. Samples of saproxylic beetles varied greatly depending on collection method; however window trap captures were compositionally similar regardless of their placement (on snags or freely-hanging). This suggests that window traps are less appropriate for assessing small-scale habitat associations. Deadwood associations revealed here indicate that a wide range of substrate types, decay classes, and sizes are important features of saproxylic beetle habitats that should be retained for biodiversity conservation.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3Z62C
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 4645566
Last modified: 2015:10:12 20:30:29-06:00
Filename: Wood_Charlene_Fall 2012.pdf
Original checksum: f015b594ac20ce465b2ab5ed00ffc37b
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File author: Charlene Wood
Page count: 234
File language: en-CA
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