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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3S034

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A Method to Enhance Re-Endothelialization of Tissue Engineered Decellularized Allograft Heart Scaffolds Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Tissue Engineering
Re-Endothelialization
Decellularization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Desai, Leena
Supervisor and department
Korbutt, Gregory (Surgery)
Examining committee member and department
Meyer, Steven (Surgery)
Thebaud, Bernard (Pediatrics)
Ross, David (Surgery)
Department
Department of Surgery
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-08-14T15:12:36Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Allograft tissue is used to reconstruct cardiac birth defects but induces an immune response resulting in allo-sensitization. Decellularization reduces the immune response, however, acellular vascular tissue is thrombogenic. In-vitro endothelialization may attenuate thrombogenicity. Here we offer our work, which determines a novel method of endothelial cell attachment using Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid (RGD) peptides. We show that an RGD-FITC peptide can be bound to a decellularized ovine cardiac scaffold. RGD modification increases HUVEC cell adhesion to the surface at 3 days of static incubation in-vitro compared to decellularized tissue alone. Repetition using a decellularized human scaffold shows similar results. Cleavage of the potentially immunogenic FITC label retains our RGD peptide. In summary, we determine that decellularized allografts show enhanced HUVEC cell adhesion when modified with an RGD peptide under static conditions. This may increase cell retention in-vivo leading to a decellularized cardiac allograft repopulated with functional autologous cells from the recipient.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3S034
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2015:10:18 01:36:19-06:00
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File title: Final Thesis Title 2.pdf
File title: University of Alberta
File author: Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
Page count: 133
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