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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3MW28S2R

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A Hole in the World, for Electric Guitar and MAX Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
improvisation
cyborg
computer
guitar
posthumanism
programming
memory
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Wall, David G
Supervisor and department
Hannesson, Mark (Music)
Examining committee member and department
Gramit, David (Music)
Smallwood, Scott (Music)
Quamen, Harvey (English and Film Studies)
Eagle, David (Music)
Department
Department of Music
Specialization

Date accepted
2015-08-26T08:34:37Z
Graduation date
2015-11
Degree
Doctor of Music
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
A Hole in the World is an open composition for prepared electric guitar, archival recording, and audio programming. Text-fragments culled from my father’s recorded autobiography serve as the focal point of the piece. Transformations of these text-fragments within the audio programming language Max are created using the Kinect motion sensor camera, and through use of the computer keyboard. Invoking my father with the use of computer technology highlights the relationships between myself and my father, between human and machine, between composer and performer, and between the real and the virtual. These relationships are played out over the course of three movements. Each of the three movements is conceived of as a unique “memory-space.” Each contains related texts, and each constructs sonic relationships between electric guitar textures and Max patches. The goal of the project is to begin to define a method of composition that allows for the acceptance of nonhuman others as part of a collaborative process. In order to do this, I use a process of decentering to explore ideas of multiplicity, boundary dissolution, non-human centric composition, and connection with nonhuman others.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3MW28S2R
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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Last modified: 2016:06:24 17:04:17-06:00
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