ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Epidemiology and Use of Health Services for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Aboriginal Peoples in Alberta: Insights into Aboriginal Peoples’ Respiratory HealthDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3ZG6GG16

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Epidemiology and Use of Health Services for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Aboriginal Peoples in Alberta: Insights into Aboriginal Peoples’ Respiratory Health Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Epidemiology
Health inequalities
Aboriginal health
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ospina, Maria-Beatriz
Supervisor and department
Brian H. Rowe (Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry)
Don Voaklander (School of Public Health)
Examining committee member and department
Malcolm King (Faculty of Health Sciences; Simon Fraser University, Vancouver BC)
Michael Stickland (Department of Medicine; Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry)
Eric Wong (Department of Medicine; Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry)
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan (School of Public Health)
Tom Marrie (Faculty of Medicine; Dalhousie University, Halifax NS)
Department
Department of Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Public Health
Date accepted
2013-10-03T10:00:56Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Degree level
Doctoral
Abstract
Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major respiratory disorder and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There is limited information about the burden of disease for COPD among Aboriginal peoples in Canada. Objectives: To compare the epidemiology and patterns of health services use for COPD between Aboriginal (First Nations peoples, Métis and Inuit) and non-Aboriginal peoples in Alberta, Canada while adjusting for important clinical and sociodemographic factors. Methods: A systematic review synthesized epidemiological evidence on the prevalence, mortality and health services use for COPD in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations from a variety of settings. Three retrospective cohort studies based on linkage of administrative health databases in Alberta, Canada from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2010 compared prevalence and incidence rates of COPD between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal cohorts in the province, and evaluated all-cause mortality, and rates of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits following a diagnosis of COPD. Poisson regression and Cox’s proportional hazard models were used in the multivariate analysis. Results: Limited scientific evidence informed differences in COPD prevalence, mortality and health services use between Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal populations. The retrospective cohort studies found that Aboriginal peoples in Alberta have higher prevalence and incidence rates of COPD than the non-Aboriginal cohort, with Registered First Nations peoples and Inuit having the highest rates of COPD. Overall, all-cause mortality in Aboriginal peoples did not differ from that of non-Aboriginals up to five years after being diagnosed with COPD. Métis and Inuit with COPD had a lower mortality hazard, whereas no differences in mortality were found between Registered First Nations peoples and non-Aboriginals. Given a diagnosis of COPD, Aboriginal peoples had higher hospitalizations and ED visits rates than non-Aboriginals, with Registered First Nations peoples having the highest utilization rates among the three Aboriginal groups. Conclusions: While Aboriginal peoples in Alberta have a higher burden of COPD than the non-Aboriginal population, the condition affects the three Aboriginal groups differently. Reasons for these differences should be further explored within a framework of social determinants of health to effectively influence modifiable risk factors in each of the Aboriginal groups.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3ZG6GG16
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Ospina MB, Voaklander DC, Stickland MK, King M, Senthilselvan A, Rowe BH. Prevalence of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations: a systematic review and meta- analysis of epidemiological studies. Can Respir J 2012;19(6):355-60

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2015-01-08T08:05:07.514+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 22824708
Last modified: 2015:10:12 15:44:45-06:00
Filename: Ospina_MariaBeatriz_Fall 2013.pdf
Original checksum: 83f8e08eade6d8ec64c95e1fca829246
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Microsoft Word - Maria Ospina PhD DissertationFINAL.doc
File author: Maria Ospina
Page count: 250
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date