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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TX44

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Self harm assessment using psychometric and clinical factors in the emergency department Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
self injurious behaviours
psychiatry
emergency medicine
risk assessment
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Randall, Jason
Supervisor and department
Rowe, Brian (Emergency Medicine)
Colman, Ian (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Thompson, Angus (Institue of Health Economics)
Dong, Kathryn (Emergency Medicine)
Department
Public Health Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-08-17T13:13:52Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The assessment of self harm risk is a common, difficult, and perplexing task for many physicians, especially those working in the emergency department (ED). A cohort study was conducted where 181 patients were enrolled in two EDs within the city of Edmonton. Initial interviews were conducted in the ED which collected basic demographics and medical history as well as psychometric measures. One of these measures was a novel method of assessing implicit cognitions of self harm and death. The occurrence of self harm behaviour was assessed 3 months after presentation. Regression analysis found a model, including a measure of implicit cognition, which was effective at predicting future self harm for most patients. Receiver operating characteristics of the final logistic regression model using two cut-points obtained a sensitivity of 96.6% and specificity of 53.9% for the low cut off and 58.6% and 96.2% for the high cut off.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3TX44
Rights
License granted by Jason Randall (jrandall@ualberta.ca) on 2011-08-13T22:11:40Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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