ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of The Influence of Gender and Food Insecurity on the Eating Practices of Poor, Pregnant Women in Dhaka, BangladeshDownload the full-sized PDF

Actions

Download  |  Analytics

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

The Influence of Gender and Food Insecurity on the Eating Practices of Poor, Pregnant Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
pregnant
gender
Dhaka
food security
Bangladesh
urban
eating practices
slum
food insecurity
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Levay, Adrienne
Supervisor and department
Mumtaz, Zubia (Public Health Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Willows, Noreen (Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science)
Vallianatos, Helen (Department of Anthropology)
Department
School Public Health Sciences
Specialization
Global Health
Date accepted
2012-01-30T17:08:38Z
Graduation date
2012-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between rising levels of food insecurity in the urban setting and the existing gender structures and their impact on eating practices while pregnant. Using a focused-ethnography with a feminist approach in an urban slum in Dhaka, Bangladesh, we interviewed pregnant women and new mothers as well as older women, traditional midwives, delivery center staff and husbands. Knowledge around food practices while pregnant was largely in agreement with the western biomedical understanding of healthy pregnancy nutrition. However, women were largely unable to operationalize this knowledge due to poverty. Gender norms in the slum setting appear to be being challenged with respects to mobility and decision-making. However, limited access to sufficient quality and quantities of food overrode women’s seemingly increased level of “freedom” in the slum. A more humanistic approach to maternal nutrition programs is proposed.
Language
English
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T03:11:18.763+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 693585
Last modified: 2015:10:12 16:43:14-06:00
Filename: Levay_Adrienne_Spring 2012.pdf
Original checksum: a9946e451745a8bc9f3cd18a5c72bca3
Well formed: true
Valid: true
Page count: 111
File language: en-CA
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date