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Theses and Dissertations

Gabor-gist Visual Homing Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Gabor-gist
Visual Homing
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mills, Michael J
Supervisor and department
Zhang, Hong (Computing Science)
Examining committee member and department
Jagersand, Martin (Computing Science)
Zhang, Hong (Computing Science)
Ray, Nilanjan (Computing Science)
Department
Department of Computing Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-09-28T20:03:01Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Many robotic systems are required to navigate or home to learned location using minimal resources. Autonomous robots are generally limited in computation and storage resources, imposing significant challenges on algorithm design. Particularly when only visual data is used, these algorithms need to be robust and efficient. In addition, independence from a scene model is preferred. Extraction of models and calibration procedures are time consuming and sensitive to changes in the environ- ment. Visual homing without a geometric model is studied in mapless or qualitative visual homing. In this thesis, we adopt a framework based on View-Sequenced Route Representation (VSRR) and contribute in two areas: Compact representa- tion of the path and visual homing along a desired route using the representation, and secondly develop an algorithm which localizes the robot using a novel concept we call eigensegments. The effectiveness of the system is demonstrated with both indoor and outdoor environments.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R33X83T9G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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