ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Succession, herbicides, forage nutrition and elk body condition at  Mount St. Helens, WashingtonDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3B853S1N

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Graduate Studies and Research, Faculty of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Theses and Dissertations

Succession, herbicides, forage nutrition and elk body condition at Mount St. Helens, Washington Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Herbicide
Elk
Nutrition
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Geary, Andrew Bruce
Supervisor and department
Merrill, Evelyn (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Nielsen, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Bork, Edward (Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science)
Cook, John (National Council for Air and Stream Improvement)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2014-01-31T15:04:33Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Concerns have been voiced over recent reductions in forest cutting, herbicide spraying, and past heavy grazing on nutritional resources for elk (Cervus elaphus) and their body condition in the Pacific Northwest. I evaluated the effects of herbicides and herbivory on elk forage in a paired, retrospective vegetation sampling design for early seral (<13yrs) forests around Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. Common herbicide regimes reduced elk forage for <3 years after stand initiation and shortened the period of availability of the most nutritious forages prior to forest canopy closure. Herbicide-treated early seral stands provided higher nutritional resources for elk than mid and late-seral stands. Herbivory reduced biomass, primarily of highly palatable shrub species due to reductions in plant height rather than density. I related elk body fat derived from organs collected from hunter-harvested lactating elk in fall 2011 at MSH (n=55) to the habitat surrounding kill locations. Probability of an elk being pregnant was related to body fat. Lactating females were not thinner than non-lactating female elk, and barren non-lactating individuals had the poorest body condition. The most supported model predicting body fat of lactating elk included harvest date, elevation, and elk density.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3B853S1N
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-06-15T07:03:04.911+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 5209802
Last modified: 2015:10:12 17:27:59-06:00
Filename: Geary_Andrew_Spring 2014.pdf
Original checksum: 529cab9725d8ef6c29bb6e545f93c5b2
Well formed: true
Valid: true
File title: Microsoft Word - AG_final_Thesis_ Jan31_2014
File author: Andrew Geary
Page count: 204
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date