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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R34037

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Representing Pakistan through Folk Music and Dance Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
heritage
Pakistani culture
War Against Terror and cultural diplomacy
national music
State patronage of arts
nationalist elite
Folk Music
language controversy in Pakistan
Lok Virsa
Representations of Pakistan
Muslim culture
nationalist use of archaeology
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Hemani, Shumaila
Supervisor and department
Federico Spinetti
Regula Burckhardt Qureshi,
Examining committee member and department
Mary Ingram
Andriy NAHACHEWSKY
Department
Department of Music
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-10-03T04:28:09Z
Graduation date
2011-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Folk music is a site of contestation to define national culture and language amongst the cultural elites in Pakistan. The elites who established cultural institutions for the promotion of folk music represented Pakistan either as a cultural unit with Islam and the Urdu language as its unifying bond, or resisted this position by considering Pakistan as a culturally diverse unit, in which national culture could emerge only through a synthesis of regional cultures and not through the imposition of a single culture and language. I apply Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of practice to situate my informants within the policies of three institutions: national media, Pakistan National Council of Arts (PNCA) and Lok Virsa, in the period between 1965 and 1985. This period covers three major political regimes, when my informants participated in establishing and maintain cultural institutions that were revived after 9/11 to showcase Pakistan in the international community.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R34037
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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