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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3JD4G

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Field experiment observations of a dryline and the associated clouds and precipitation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Thunderstorm
Field Experiment
Humidity
Meteorology
Dryline
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Daniel, Brown
Supervisor and department
Reuter, Gerhard (Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Myers, Paul (Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Strong, Geoff (Department of Physics)
Heimpel, Moritz (Department of Physics)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-01-28T20:57:10Z
Graduation date
2010-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
The UNderstanding Severe Thunderstorms and Alberta Boundary Layer Experiment (UNSTABLE) in July 2008 was a field project to investigate the initiation of thunderstorms in southern Alberta. Special field observations included an enhanced surface network augmented with instrumented vehicles. Upper air observations were taken from four sites every two hours. This thesis focuses on the case study day of 17 July 2008 when a dryline formed parallel to the Rocky Mountains at 1030 MDT and persisted for up to nine hours. The vapour mixing ratio changed from 4.5 to 8.5 g/kg over 5 km. We documented the spatial and temporal distribution of cloud and precipitation relative to the dryline. Initially, extensive cloud formed over the dry air to the west of the dryline, while the capping inversion at 800 mb inhibited cloud formation in the moist air. In the afternoon, convection was triggered along the dryline and severe thunderstorms were observed.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3JD4G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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