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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3Q61T

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The impact of recreational activities on an alpine vascular plant community in the Canadian Rockies Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
recreation impacts
tundra
alpine
Canadian Rockies
vascular plants
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Crisfield, Varina
Supervisor and department
Ellen Macdonald (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Joyce Gould (Alberta Parks)
Peter Kershaw (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Scott Chang (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-08-31T19:49:24Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Alpine tundra is notorious for its fragility and slow recovery following disturbance. Tourism is increasing in alpine areas, creating the need to improve our understanding of the impacts of recreation in these ecosystems. This study examined the impacts of hiking and off-highway vehicle use on the vascular flora of dry alpine meadows in the Canadian Rockies by comparing community data, including rare plant distributions, on recreational trails, on intact tundra meadows, and on sparsely vegetated gravel steps formed by frost disturbance. The trails were found to be different from both undisturbed and naturally disturbed tundra in terms of vascular plant cover, diversity, species composition and soil compaction. Rare plants do not seem to be adversely affected by recreational activities. Trampling leads to environmental conditions that will likely make regeneration of abandoned trails an extremely slow process, and it is advisable to limit the extent of trail networks in alpine areas.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3Q61T
Rights
License granted by Varina Crisfield (crisfiel@ualberta.ca) on 2010-08-31T19:07:37Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 15952173
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:27:38-06:00
Filename: Thesis final.pdf
Original checksum: 3dad5ec9c782dabbdb6fefff5ed80e26
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Status message: File header gives version as 1.4, but catalog dictionary gives version as 1.3
File title: Thesis final
File author: Varina Crisfield
Page count: 153
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