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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3J62N

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The Effects of a Quality Grading System on the Development of Consumer Driven Best Practice Value Chains: The Example of Meat Standards Australia Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Best Value Supply Chain
BVSC
Coordination
Quality Grading
Value Chain
Meat Standards Australia
Label
Information
Certification
Beef
MSA
Consumer
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Bott, Gregory
Supervisor and department
Dr Sven Anders (Department of Rural Economy)
Examining committee member and department
Dr Bodo Steiner (Department of Rural Economy)
Dr Wendy Umberger, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine Business, University of Adelaide, Australia
Department
Department of Rural Economy
Specialization

Date accepted
2010-09-23T18:47:42Z
Graduation date
2010-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This research project analyzes the beef grading system in Australia. Firstly, the Meat Standards Australia (MSA) grading system as a potential value-creating and value chain-coordinating mechanism is investigated. In-depth interviews with value chain stakeholders and industry experts suggest that the implementation of the MSA grading system has had a catalytic effect of moving value chains toward a greater level of coordination. The concept of best value supply chains is also used as a benchmark in determining MSA’s effect on value chain performance. Secondly, using a survey of Australian consumers, findings suggest that the MSA certification is perceived as a trustworthy signal for tenderness and quality, reducing information asymmetry at the consumer level. This thesis then addresses the questions of whether or not it is necessary to use a grading system in consumer marketing (e.g. quality label) in order to be successful in terms of adding value to the industry.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3J62N
Rights
License granted by Gregory Bott (gbott@ualberta.ca) on 2010-09-22T17:36:20Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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