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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3BC95

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Landscape Ecology of Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and White-tailed Deer (O. virginianus) with Implications for Chronic Wasting Disease Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
disease
landscape
deer
source
sink
connectivity
ecology
Alberta
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Nobert, Barry R
Supervisor and department
Merrill, Evelyn (Biological Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Lewis, Mark (Mathematical and Statistical Sciences)
Nielsen, Scott (Renewable Resources)
Pybus, Margo (Biological Sciences)
Department
Department of Biological Sciences
Specialization
Ecology
Date accepted
2012-10-02T10:23:20Z
Graduation date
2012-09
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of cervids that continues to spread into new regions of Canada despite containment efforts. I examine the importance of landscape connectivity using circuit theory and source/sink habitats that are based on selection, survival and reproduction in order to assess CWD spread risk among deer in Alberta, Canada. I found for hunter-harvested deer that the likelihood of being CWD-positive was higher for mule deer than white-tailed deer and for deer in habitat associated with river drainages and areas more connected to previously detected CWD-positive deer. Source habitats differed between the two species primarily due to differences in habitat selection, with consequences for reproduction and hunting mortality in mule deer and natural mortality in white-tailed deer. My results will help wildlife managers prioritize areas for CWD monitoring and control, as well as contribute to the development of future spatially explicit disease spread models.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3BC95
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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