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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31G0J20H

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Understanding the Role of Surface Microgeometries on Wetting: Designing Robust Superhydrophobic Surfaces Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Superhydrophobic Surface
Re-entrant Microstructures
Transition Energy Barrier
Contact Angle
Anti-Icing
Freezing Delay
Roughness
Frosting
Freezing Point
Thermodynamic
Drop Freezing
DSC
Wetting Map
Wetting Transition
Length Scale
Free Energy Barrier
Microgeometries
Microfabrication
Composite State
Edge Effect
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Fang, Guoping
Supervisor and department
Fleck, Brian (Mechanical Engineering)
Amirfazli, Alidad (Department of Mechanical Engineering, York University)
Examining committee member and department
Sameoto, Dan (Mechanical Engineering)
Department
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-03-31T15:55:39Z
Graduation date
2014-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis is concerned with effects of surface microgeometries on wetting, aiming at providing instructions for reproducing controllable wettability on artificial surfaces and designing robust superhydrophobic surfaces. First, the origin of edge effect is understood by a thermodynamic approach for the analysis of energetic state of drops on a single pillar. A wetting map in terms of edge angle and intrinsic contact angle is provided for designing microstructures to prevent drop collapse/spilling over the pillar. Secondly, wetting transitions on various microstructured surfaces (i.e., arrays of pillars) has been understood by a first-principle thermodynamic model. Effects of surface parameters, i.e., intrinsic CA, edge angle and length scale factor, on wetting stability has been revealed. Finally, an experimental study on the application of superhydrophobic surfaces in low-temperature conditions is carried out by using differential scanning calorimetry and a thermoelectric cooler. Effects of various factors responsible for drop freezing have been systematically investigated.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31G0J20H
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
Citation for previous publication
Fang, G.; Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 2012, 28, 9421-9430.

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File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
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File size: 6178042
Last modified: 2015:10:12 19:31:43-06:00
Filename: Fang_Guoping_Spring 2014.pdf
Original checksum: f5f6c1565d1a45706d9504556e63653c
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File title: Chapter 1 - Introduction and Objectives
File title: Guoping Fang
File author: Albert
Page count: 192
File language: zh-CN
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