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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3H96W

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PLANT FATTY ACIDS INFLUENCE BROOD DEVELOPMENT OF MOUNTAIN PINE BEETLE AND GROWTH OF ITS SYMBIOTIC FUNGUS: IMPLICATIONS TO HOST-RANGE EXPANSION OF AN HERBIVOROUS INSECT Open Access

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Other title
Subject/Keyword
Mountain pine beetle
Fatty acids in plants
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Ishangulyyeva, Guncha
Supervisor and department
Erbilgin, Nadir (Renewable Resources)
Examining committee member and department
Evenden, Maya (Biological Sciences)
Zwiazek, Janusz (Renewable Resources)
Manson, Jessamyn (Biological Sciences)
Erbilgin, Nadir (Renewable Resources)
Department
Department of Renewable Resources
Specialization
Forest biology and management
Date accepted
2015-03-27T11:37:07Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Nutritional composition of plants can affect the performance of insect herbivores and their associated microbial symbionts. Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is an important bark beetle species that colonizes many species of Pinus within its historical range and encounter host species with different nutritional compositions. This insect has recently expanded its host range to jack pine (P. banksiana) forests, which is considered a novel host in terms of encounters with D. ponderosae. The nutritional aspects of selecting this new host are largely unknown. Here, I tested whether the recent host of D. ponderosae contains similar fatty acid concentrations as the beetle’s historical hosts and whether such similarity influenced the host expansion of D. ponderosae. I demonstrated that historical (lodgepole pine, P. contorta) and novel hosts are distinguished from a non-host (Populus tremuloides) species of D. ponderosae by concentrations of phloem fatty acids, such as linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids. Furthermore, the resulting information provides new insights into the biological roles of plant fatty acids in the survival of D. ponderosae larvae and establishment of the beetle’s symbiotic fungus, Grosmannia clavigera.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3H96W
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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