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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3FJ29R2Q

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Prescribed fire as a tool to regenerate live and dead serotinous jack pine (Pinus banksiana) stands Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Sharpe, Maria
Hwang, Hyejin
Schroeder, David
Ryu, Soung R.
Lieffers, Victor J.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Mountain Pine Beetle
Serotiny
Precribed Fire
Jack Pine
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
This study documents cone opening and natural regeneration of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) after burning live and dead stands similar to those killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae). Trees were killed by girdling in May and were burned in late July, 26 months later. Pairs of live and dead plots were simultaneously burned using three types of fire: surface, intermittent crown and continuous crown fires. Each type of fire was replicated three times; the nine pairs of burns were completed in a 4-day period. After fire, more cones were opened on dead trees than live trees. On dead trees, there was cone opening even when fire charred only the lower part of the bole. Three years after burning, dead stands with continuous crown fires had some of the densest regeneration and the highest rates of stocking. Across all burns in this study, seedling regeneration was best in shallow residual duff and in the more intensely burned plots. Without burning, there was virtually no regeneration 5 years after mortality. The results also show that burning, especially under continuous crown fire, could be used to promote regeneration in dead stands.
Date created
2017
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3FJ29R2Q
License information
Rights
http://www.publish.csiro.au/wf/Fulltext/WF17046
Citation for previous publication
NOTE to ERA Editor: This is a published paper with the International Journal of Wildland Fire. Below is a note in "" from the editor regarding publication permissions to websites: "You may not include the PDF on any website or on any server, including an institutional repository. You may place a pre-publication version of your work on your personal website or in your institutional repository provided that you include a link to the definitive version on the journal’s website. Please contact the Permissions Manager at  publishing@csiro.au
or refer to the CSIRO Publishing For Authors page if you wish to use the PDF for any purpose other than those listed above (e.g. including specific usage rights with regard to ResearchGate and Academia). "

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