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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35W3H

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Optimization of In Vitro Cultures of Neonatal Porcine Islets Pre-transplantation Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Islet xenotransplantation
Protease inhibitor
Neonatal porcine islet cultures
Neonatal porcine islets
Caspase inhibitor
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Sidhu, Satinder K.
Supervisor and department
Korbutt, Greg (Surgery)
Examining committee member and department
Chan, Catherine (Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science)
Rayat, Gina (Surgery)
Korbutt, Greg (Surgery)
Department
Department of Surgery
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-07-28T21:00:29Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Islet transplantation is an attractive method to achieve blood glucose homeostasis. However, β-cell function declines over time. Therefore, it is necessary to explore strategies to enhance the β-cell mass and function. Also, because there is a severe shortage of human cadaver tissue, alternative sources of insulin secreting tissue need to be examined. Neonatal porcine islet (NPI) tissue has emerged as an attractive alternative source of β-cells. The aim of this thesis was to optimize the culturing conditions of NPIs pre-transplantation so that the available tissue can be used as efficiently and economically as possible. The results from this study indicate that the treatment of NPI cultures with z-VAD-FMK, a pan caspase inhibitor and general protease inhibitor significantly enhances β-cell survival. Additionally, the optimum length of culturing NPIs pre-transplantation appears to be 3-5 days. Since widespread cell death stimulates immunogenic response, this treatment also has the potential benefit of reducing immunosuppression needs in the recipient.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35W3H
Rights
License granted by Satinder Sidhu (sksidhu@ualberta.ca) on 2009-07-27T18:07:29Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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