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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M03Z569

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Theses and Dissertations

Backcountry snowmobilers’ risk perceptions, avalanche related information seeking behaviours, preparedness and decision-making processes Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Preparedness
Backcountry snowmobiling
Voluntary Risk
Decision-Making
Avalanches
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Baker, Jennifer
Supervisor and department
Tara McGee (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Examining committee member and department
Naomi Krogman (Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology)
Damian Collins (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)
Department
Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
Specialization

Date accepted
2013-09-30T14:34:16Z
Graduation date
2013-11
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Although there has been substantial research on the avoidance of risk, much less has been completed on voluntary risk. This study examined backcountry snowmobilers’ risk perceptions, avalanche related information seeking behaviours, and decision-making processes when dealing with avalanches and backcountry risk in Canada. To accomplish this, in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 participants who were involved in backcountry snowmobiling. Interviews were done both in person and by telephone. The results of this study show that, unlike previous research on snowmobilers, the participants of this study were well prepared and knowledgeable about backcountry risks. All 17 participants stated that they carried a shovel, probe, and transceiver with them on each backcountry trip, and 10 participants had taken an avalanche safety course. Group dynamics and positive peer pressure were influential in promoting safe backcountry behaviour.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M03Z569
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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