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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R35D0J

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The World Bank and the Knowledge for Development (K4D) Initiative: A Post-Structuralist Investigation of the World Bank’s Attempts to Govern Global Development Knowledge Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Neoliberalism
Governmentality
Knowledge
World Bank
Development
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Das, Surma
Supervisor and department
Aitken, Rob (Political Science)
Examining committee member and department
Rein, Sandra (Political Studies, Augustana)
Anderson, Greg (Political Science)
Department
Department of Political Science
Specialization

Date accepted
2011-01-14T21:08:11Z
Graduation date
2011-06
Degree
Master of Arts
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
In 1999, the World Bank launched the K4D initiative as part of its new development agenda. The Bank also established itself as the global development knowledge bank suggesting that these moves would yield more pro-poor development results. This thesis examines the Bank’s knowledge ventures and contends that they are part of the apparatus of advancing the Bank’s neoliberal agenda. The governmentality approach is used to argue that the knowledge ventures are a move away from the direct and interventionist mechanisms of control prominent in the earlier development agenda, but at the same time, representative of new, more subtle and indirect mechanisms of control. Furthermore, a close investigation of the literature published in connection to the knowledge ventures and the practical projects created as part of these ventures, reveals that neoliberal policies traditionally promoted by the Bank feature prominently in the propaganda surrounding the Bank’s knowledge ventures.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R35D0J
Rights
License granted by Surma Das (surma@ualberta.ca) on 2011-01-13T01:28:26Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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