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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3TQ6T

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An experimental investigation of the impact of fat taxes: Price effects, food stigma, and information effects on economic instruments to improve dietary health Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
multinomial
simulation
economic
tax
consumption
logit
hypothetical
stigma
obesity
experiement
consumer
junk
market
choice
information
latent
class
dietary
label
fat
warning
food
survey
snack
health
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Lacanilao, Ryan D.
Supervisor and department
Adamowicz, Vic (Rural Economy)
Cash, Sean B. (Rural Economy)
Examining committee member and department
Raine, Kim (Centre for Health Promotion Studies)
Department
Department of Rural Economy
Specialization

Date accepted
2009-06-02T14:47:02Z
Graduation date
2009-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
This thesis investigates how a tax and warning label on less healthy snack food products may affect consumer behaviour when the imposition of the tax is a source of consumer information. A survey that included choice experiments was implemented in supermarkets. Participants were asked to choose between high fat snacks, some displaying a stigmatizing warning label, and healthier snacks. Multinomial logit and latent class models exploring choice were estimated and a predictive hypothetical market was set up. Results show that the warning label had a negative price premium of about $4. The effect of price, though small, becomes even smaller as BMI increases. A fat tax for health is not recommended because it might not hit the target population, people were not very price sensitive, and it would likely be regressive. To encourage health, it appears to be more effective to display a warning label than to apply a tax.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3TQ6T
Rights
License granted by Ryan Lacanilao (rdl@ualberta.ca) on 2009-05-29T19:18:43Z (GMT): Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of the above terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis, and except as herein provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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File title: ������������������������������������������������������������������������
File title: Lacanilao_Ryan_Fall 2009
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File author: Ryan Daniel Lacanilao
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