ERA

Download the full-sized PDF of Different scales of spatial segregation of two species of feather mites on the wings of a passerine birdDownload the full-sized PDF

Analytics

Share

Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R31Z4212K

Download

Export to: EndNote  |  Zotero  |  Mendeley

Communities

This file is in the following communities:

Biological Sciences, Department of

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

Journal Articles (Biological Sciences)

Different scales of spatial segregation of two species of feather mites on the wings of a passerine bird Open Access

Descriptions

Author or creator
Mestre, A.
Mesquita-Joanes, F.
Proctor, H.
Monros, J. S.
Additional contributors
Subject/Keyword
Mechanisms
Evolution
Behavior
Ecology
Analgoidea
Coexistence
Interspecific Competition
Astigmata
Acari
Microhabitat Selection
Type of item
Journal Article (Published)
Language
English
Place
Time
Description
The \"condition-specific competition hypothesis\" proposes that coexistence of 2 species is possible when spatial or temporal variations in environmental conditions exist and each species responds differently to those conditions. The distribution of different species of feather mites on their hosts is known to be affected by intrinsic host factors such as structure of feathers and friction among feathers during flight, but there is also evidence that external factors such as humidity and temperature can affect mite distribution. Some feather mites have the capacity to move through the plumage rather rapidly, and within-host variation in intensity of sunlight could be one of the cues involved in these active displacements. We analyzed both the within-and between-feather spatial distribution of 2 mite species, Trouessartia bifurcata and Dolichodectes edwardsi, that coexist in flight feathers of the moustached warbler Acrocephalus melanopogon. A complex spatial segregation between the 2 species was observed at 3 spatial levels, i.e., \"feather surfaces,\" \"between feathers,\" and \"within feathers.\" Despite certain overlapping distribution among feathers, T. bifurcata dominated proximal and medial regions on dorsal faces, while D. edwardsi preferred disto-ventral feather areas. An experiment to check the behavioral response of T. bifurcata to sunlight showed that mites responded to light exposure by approaching the feather bases and even leaving its dorsal face. Spatial heterogeneity across the 3 analyzed levels, together with response to light and other particular species adaptations, may have played a role in the coexistence and segregation of feather mites competing for space and food in passerine birds.
Date created
2011
DOI
doi:10.7939/R31Z4212K
License information
Rights
© 2011 American Society of Parasitologists. This version of this article is open access and can be downloaded and shared. The original author(s) and source must be cited.
Citation for previous publication
Mestre, A., Mesquita-Joanes, F., Proctor, H., & Monrós, J. S. (2011). Different scales of spatial segregation of two species of feather mites on the wings of a passerine bird. The Journal of parasitology, 97(2), 237-244. DOI: 10.1645/GE-2585.1.
Source
Link to related item

File Details

Date Uploaded
Date Modified
2014-05-01T00:13:24.048+00:00
Audit Status
Audits have not yet been run on this file.
Characterization
File format: pdf (Portable Document Format)
Mime type: application/pdf
File size: 959120
Last modified: 2015:10:12 18:09:24-06:00
Filename: JOPara_97_2011_237.pdf
Original checksum: 7448945add6693da3a36f4a40d3aae17
Well formed: false
Valid: false
Status message: Unexpected error in findFonts java.lang.ClassCastException: edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfSimpleObject cannot be cast to edu.harvard.hul.ois.jhove.module.pdf.PdfDictionary offset=2694
Page count: 8
Activity of users you follow
User Activity Date