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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R30P0WX70

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WORK PATTERN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MALE AND FEMALE ORTHODONTISTS IN CANADA Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Orthodontics
Work Pattern
Feminization
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Walker, StephanieL
Supervisor and department
Dr. Louanne Keenan, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta
Examining committee member and department
Dr. Louanne Keenan, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta
Dr. Pat Flood, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberta
Dr. Giseon Heo, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta
Dr. Maryam Sharifzadeh-Amin, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta
Dr. Carlos Flores-Mir, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta
Department
Medical Sciences-Orthodontics
Specialization

Date accepted
2014-07-10T14:35:26Z
Graduation date
2014-11
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Objective: To examine sex-specific differences in the demographics and work patterns of Canadian orthodontists. Methods: Questionnaires were mailed/E-mailed to a random sample of 384 orthodontists (189 male, 95 female). Questions regarding work patterns and personal demographics were created and sex-specific comparisons were conducted. Results: The response rate was 53.9%. The demographics and work patterns for male and female orthodontists were similar for most variables. Females were found to be younger; anticipating earlier retirement; and more likely to take a leave of absence. When analyzing the effects of the sex, age, and number of children, age significant affected the number of hours worked per week and number of phase II starts per year. Having children did not significantly affect any variables analyzed. Conclusions: As female orthodontists were not found to practice substantially different from males, it is not possible to speculate that the increasing number of women specializing in orthodontics would provoke change in the profession.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R30P0WX70
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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