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Permanent link (DOI): https://doi.org/10.7939/R3M08G

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A Comparative Analytical Study on Low-Voltage Ride-Through Reference-Current-Generation (LVRT-RCG) Strategies in Converter-Interfaced DER Units Open Access

Descriptions

Other title
Subject/Keyword
Maximum Reactive Power Injection
Grid Converter
Instantaneous Power Theory
Smooth Power Injection
Voltage Dip
Negative Sequence Current
Low Voltage Ride Through
Voltage Sag
Symmetrical Components
Instantaneous Power Control
Flexible Positive Negative Sequence Control
Ancillary Services
Positive Negative Sequence Control
Distributed Energy Resource
Distributed Generation
Reactive Current Injection
Positive Negative Sequences
Voltage Sequences
Reference Current Generation
Unbalanced Voltage
Grid Fault
Flexible Voltage Support
Unbalanced Current Injection
Power Converters
Power Oscillations
Fault Current Limitation
Flexible Power Control
Voltage Support
Asymmetrical Grid Faults
Fault Ride Through
Type of item
Thesis
Degree grantor
University of Alberta
Author or creator
Mohammadalizadeh Shabestary, Masoud
Supervisor and department
Xu, Wilsun (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Mohamed, Yasser (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Examining committee member and department
Liang, Hao (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Xu, Wilsun (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Mohamed, Yasser (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Dinavahi, Venkata (Electrical and Computer Engineering)
Department
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Specialization
Energy Systems
Date accepted
2015-01-26T10:48:17Z
Graduation date
2015-06
Degree
Master of Science
Degree level
Master's
Abstract
Recently, riding through grid faults and supporting the grid voltage under faults have become major requirements in distributed energy resource (DER) units. There have been also extensive efforts in academia and industry to develop and implement control strategies to ride through voltage disturbances, and even to support the grid under such faulted conditions which can be named as low-voltage ride-through (LVRT) technology. Therefore, a comprehensive and comparative study seems to be very useful in order to analyze and discuss available LVRT reference-current-generation (LVRT-RCG) strategies in converter-interfaced DER units, compare their performances, and introduce their pros and cons. This thesis studies all existing (nine) LVRT-RCG strategies available in the literature. These strategies are categorized into two main groups. The analytical evaluations and mathematical assessments of all LVRT-RCG strategies are performed. For a comprehensive evaluation of these strategies, the following important parameters are used in this study: instantaneous active/reactive powers oscillation and maximum phase currents. Analytical expressions of these parameters are formulated, evaluated and used to conduct several evaluation and comparative studies on different strategies. Based on the obtained formulas for the maximum phase currents, the maximum allowable reactive power delivery (MARPD) equations are proposed specifically for each of the nine LVRT-RCG strategies. Proposed equations help each LVRT-RCG technique to provide their best voltage support under the specific maximum phase current restrictions imposed by DER owners. Using different test cases, the strategies are compared and the proposed equations are validated. This thesis can be helpful to evaluate the performance of existing LVRT-RCG strategies, solve their existing drawbacks, exploit the best performance out of each, combine their individual capabilities, and improve them.
Language
English
DOI
doi:10.7939/R3M08G
Rights
Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis and to lend or sell such copies for private, scholarly or scientific research purposes only. Where the thesis is converted to, or otherwise made available in digital form, the University of Alberta will advise potential users of the thesis of these terms. The author reserves all other publication and other rights in association with the copyright in the thesis and, except as herein before provided, neither the thesis nor any substantial portion thereof may be printed or otherwise reproduced in any material form whatsoever without the author's prior written permission.
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